St. Michael the Archangel - South Shore


Saturday Mass 

5:00 pm (E)

Sunday Mass

8:00 am,9:30 am (E),11:00am (S)

Daily Mass 

6:30 am    (E)

School Mass 

Wednesday  8:00 am (E)

 An accessible ramp is located on the west side of the church.  




New to the Parish?

We invite you to register online by completing the form under Resources or pick up a registration form in the pastoral center and drop it off  at our office to pick up your offering envelopes. 

Adoration Chapel

Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament is held every Thursday and Friday of the week. Exposition and Benediction takes place on Thursdays after the 6:30 am mass. Adoration continues until 7 pm on both days. We are always in need of Adorers to commit to spending time before the Blessed Sacrament each week.

Prayer Chapel

Prayer Chapel is open

(inside Pastoral Center)

Monday - Friday

Hours: 8:00am - 4:00pm


Confessions are heard on Saturday's at 4:00pm.

Or by setting up an appointment.


Looking to build a Family Tree?

Contact Flor Hernandez via email :  for information.


“Like” us on Facebook to receive information on current events in the Parish  

St. Michael Parish Tour


Would like to make a donation?




Contact Us

8237 S. South Shore Dr.

Chicago, IL 60617

Phone: 773.734.4921

Fax: 773.734.8723


News & Upcoming Events

Rosa Pelaez

Last Sunday, October 23, Archbishop Cardinal Blasé Cupich elect and our Bishop of Vicariate 6, Bishop Joseph Perry awarded the Christifideles Award to Rosa Rodriguez-Pelaez whom I nominated.


This award recognizes a lay person’s involvement in our parish who helps achieve mission vitality. During the past few years Rosa maintained St. Michael’s mission vitality. She is one of many. When I arrived August of 2013 she had assumed many roles of leadership that had been given her by previous pastors or administrators. As parish leaders moved she was given responsibilities, pastoral concerns to maintain the viability of the parish.


Rosa is a lifelong member, since this is the parish of her childhood. She had been in parish leadership with her late husband Dorian, before he suffered a heart attack while participating in a fundraising event. She continued to be involved in the parish and school as well as at St. Francis de Sales H.S. and De La Salle H.S. as a single parent. She continues to be a contributing member of the parish. She had been in charge of training, scheduling and supervising the altar servers; taught religious education as well as achieving her CRE accreditation; volunteered as the Director of Religious Education until last July. She was Business Manager for many years maintaining the books and supervising the parish spending as well as managing the gift shop. While the parish was without a pastor for two years, she worked closely with the administrator as the responsible person on site. I felt proud to see her awarded for her sacrificial service which supports the vitality of St. Michael the Archangel Parish



Is it okay for Catholics to celebrate Halloween? An exorcist explains

Denver, CO (Catholic Online) - "It was the kind of neighborhood outside of Philadelphia where everybody knew each other, and it was a really fun neighborhood thing," Cunningham told CNA. "People were just out talking while kids were trick or treating, and it had been really nice up until that point."

That point, Cunningham recalled, was in the early 1990s, when pop culture saw a resurgence of the character "Freddy Krueger," a skinless serial killer who slashes and kills his victims with a razored glove and first appeared in the 1984 film "A Nightmare on Elm Street."

Cunningham's youngest at that point was a year and a half, "and she spent the entire night crying upstairs because of all these kids coming to our door; every other kid was Freddy Krueger."

That year, Halloween seemed to have taken a sharp turn towards the sinister and the dark, Cunningham said.

And she wasn't alone in her observations. Several moms from the neighborhood and her weekly rosary group had noticed the same thing. That next fall, as Halloween approached, they decided that instead of trick-or-treating, they would host an All Saints Day party at their parish, complete with a potluck, saint costumes, and tons of candy.

"We knew would be really important (to have candy) for kids who had been trick or treating, and it was an absolute blast, it was really so much better than we expected," Cunningham said.

As some Catholics see darker elements of some Halloween celebrations, parents like Cunningham often face similar dilemmas - what to do about Halloween?

The History of the holiday

The exact origins of Halloween and its traditions are somewhat muddled.

Some historians claim that Halloween is a "baptized" form of Samhain, an ancient Gaelic festival celebrating the harvest and marking the beginning of winter - the time of year when a significant portion of the population would often die.

Because of the fear of death that came with winter, celebrations of Samhain seemed to have included going door to door asking for treats dressed in costumes, which were thought to disguise the living from  life-taking spirits.

The Catholic feast of All Saints Days traces its origins in the Church to the year 609, and it was first celebrated in May. However, in the 9th century, Pope Gregory IV moved the holiday to Nov. 1, so that Oct. 31 would become the celebration of the vigil of the feast - All Hallow's Eve.

While some historians believe this move was made so the holiday could coincide with, and thus "baptize", the holiday of Samhain, other historians believe that this may have been because the Germanic church was already celebrating All Saints Day on November 1, and the move had less to do with Samhain than previously thought.

An exorcist's perspective

Father Vincent Lampert is a Vatican-trained exorcist and a parish priest of the Archdiocese of Indianapolis who travels the country, speaking about his work as an exorcist and what people can do to protect themselves against the demonic.

He said when deciding what to do about Halloween, it's important for parents to remember the Christian origins of the holiday and to celebrate accordingly, rather than in a way that glorifies evil.

"Ultimately I don't think there's anything wrong with the kids putting on a costume, dressing up as a cowboy or Cinderella, and going through the neighborhood and asking for candy; that's all good clean fun," Fr. Lampert said.

Even a sheet with some holes cut in it as a ghost is fine, Fr. Lampert said.


Is Halloween safe for trick-or-treating (abejorro34/Flickr)?

The danger lies in costumes that deliberately glorify evil and instill fear in people, or when people pretend to have special powers or dabble in magic and witchcraft, even if they think it's just for entertainment.  

"In the book of Deuteronomy, in chapter 18, it talks about not trying to consult the spirits of the dead, not consulting those who dabble in magic and witchcraft and the like," he said, "because it's a violation of a church commandment that people are putting other things ahead of their relationship with God."

"And that would be the danger of Halloween that somehow God is lost in all of this, the religious connotation is lost and then people end up glorifying evil."

It's also important to remember that the devil and evil spirits do not actually have any additional authority on Halloween, Fr. Lampert said, and that it only seems that way.

"It's because of what people are doing, not because of what the devil is doing. Perhaps by the way they're celebrating that day, they're actually inviting more evil into our lives," he said.

One of the best things parents can do is to use Halloween as a teachable moment, Fr. Lampert said. (8-**$?6);5

"A lot of children are out celebrating Halloween, perhaps evil is being glorified, but we're not really sitting around and talking about why certain practices are not conducive with our Catholic faith and our Catholic identity. I think using it as a teachable moment would be a great thing to do."

Trick-or-treating Catholics

 Anne Auger, a Catholic mom of three from Helenville, Wisc., said that while she lets her kids dress up in costumes and go trick-or-treating, she's found that she has to screen the houses as they go, avoiding ones that are decorated with scarier things.

"Last year we had this experience this person came to the door dressed like this demonic wolf with glowing eyes and it was like, what on earth?" she said.

"Sometimes people dress up like witches and I can understand that, but this was a whole new level. It's just so different from when we were little."

She also makes sure to emphasize to her children the significance of Halloween as it relates to All Saints Day, Auger said.

"We let them know that we're having a party because it's celebrating the saints in heaven, we're celebrating them, so when they're trick or treating and doing all of this we tell them it's because it's a party for all the saints."

Kate Lesnefsky, a Catholic mother of seven children ranging from ages 3-16, said she thinks it's important for Catholics not to shun Halloween completely, since it has very Christian origins.

"I think as Christians we're so used to being against the world, that sometimes we shoot ourselves in the foot, even though it might have been something that actually came from us," she said. "But then we lose the history of it, and we think, 'Oh well this is the devil's day,' just because some people say it is."

Lesnefsky said she lets her kids choose their costumes for trick-or-treating, as long as they're not too scary or demonic. The next day, her children go to Mass for All Saints Day, and the family uses it as an opportunity to talk about what it means when someone passes away, and what it means to be a saint.

"I have a sister that died when I was 19, so we talk about different people that we know in heaven, or my grandparents, and we'll talk about different saints," Lesnefsky said.

And while haunted houses and horror movies are off limits to her children, Lesnefsky said she thinks Halloween is an important time for Catholics to celebrate and be a witness in the culture.

"As Catholics it's important that we don't become fundamentalist Christians, I think that can be a detriment to our faith," she said. "If we are negligent of knowing history, then we don't even know about things that could be life-giving in our culture."

This article was originally published Oct. 31, 2015.

You are cordially invited to be a catechist!

Do you feel called by God to share or learn more about your faith?  Our faith grows when we share it! Our community of St. Michael the Archangel Parish needs you to help our young members to know and experience God in their lives. Formation for the catechists will be provided during the whole year. For information  contact Luz Eugenia Alvarez at Phone 773.734.4921 x130 or


Registrations for First Communion and Confirmation education are open!

One year intensive program for 1st. Communion and Confirmation only in Spanish. Requirements for registration: Baptism Certificate, Parish registration, $60.00 fee.

Two year regular program for 1st. Communion and Confirmation only in English. Requirements for registration: Baptism and 1st Communion certificates,  Parish registration and $60.00 fee. For registration or more info please contact Luz Eugenia Alvarez Phone: 773.734.4921 x130 

R.C.I A Registrations

St. Michael's is starting to recruit candidates who are Catholics and haven't received their Sacraments of Baptism, Communion and Confirmation. The program is also registering those who are none Catholics but would like to become full members of the Catholic Faith. The program will run from September 11th, 2016 to April 15th, 2017. For registration or information call the pastoral center 773-734-4921. Or you can talk to Fr. Patrick and Sr. Lupita.


Our Lady of Guadalupe New Shrine Project

The Guadalupano Society is asking for everyone’s help to raise funds to improve the Shrine of OLG outside by the parking lot here at St. Michael. The person or family that donates $100 will have a name plate added to the fence placed around the shrine. For more info please speak with Araceli Valdivia or David Ramirez before or after masses.

Taekwondo Class

Classes are held every Monday & Wednesday from 6pm- 7pm in school hall. For more information please talk to David Ramirez after sunday masses or contact the pastoral center.

Youth Group- Jovenes de Dios

Meetings are held every other Thursday at 6pm in the Pastoral Center. Please see bulletin for dates. If you wish to sign up, talk to David Ramirez after Sunday masses or contact the pastoral center. 

Church Lighting

The Interior of the Church is as beautiful as its people yet time has dimmed the lights. The first phase of the lighting restoration is to rewire the lights. This is estimated at $85,000. Any help is deeply appreciated. You can donate through our website and


Baptisms & Presentations

Please call the Pastoral Center ( 773.734.4921) at least two months in advance to make arrangements.

Baptismal preparation session required. Baptisms are celebrated on the 1st Sunday

of the month in Spanish and the 3rd Sunday of the  month in English.

Parents and Sponsors should be registered at St. Michael or neighborhood parish.


Please call the Pastoral Center (773.734.4921) at least two weeks in advance to make arrangements.


Sacramental Certificates

Need a Baptism, First Communion, Confirmation or Marriage Certificate?

Contact Flor Hernandez via email:  to request yours today!

Cost: $5.00 each ( we accept cash, check or pay online at

Quinceañeras, Weddings & Anniv.

Call the Pastoral Center ( 773.734.4921) at least four months in advance to make arrangements.

These masses are celebrated on Saturday's at 1:00 pm. Other arrangements must be cleared with the Pastor.


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